Edith Abbott

I am going to blog about 100 women economists and economic historians. I start with Edith Abbott. Edith Abbott: From Economics to Social Work (1876-1957) Edith Abbott, labour economist and economic historian, was the second woman to earn an Economics PhD from the University of Chicago in 1905. Interested in labour statistics and employment trends, […]

Link between education and the industrial revolution – Sharing Amol Agarwal’s post

Did education play a role in England’s industrial revolution? https://mostlyeconomics.wordpress.com/2020/01/30/did-education-play-a-role-in-englands-industrial-revolution/ — Read on mostlyeconomics.wordpress.com/2020/01/30/did-education-play-a-role-in-englands-industrial-revolution/

Video lecture series on Inequality

Economics professors Arjun Jayadev and Branko Milanovic have collaborated on a video lecture series on Inequality – the five vidoes, free to watch, clearly and succinctly explain what Inequality is all about, why you should care and other fundamentals you have been wondering about for long. It’s cut-the-clutter stuff that you shouldn’t miss. Watch here: […]

Happy birthday to Dietmar Rothermund!

For a budding economic historian, reading Dietmar Rothermund’s work on India can be an illuminating experience, given that apart from the works of Indian scholars on Indian economic history, Rothermund’s books provide a refreshing view of history. But what can be really special about this veteran historian is his extremely warm demeanour even to those […]